How to Adopt a Teacup Chihuahua

Teacup Chihuahuas are known and treasured for their small size.

Teacup Chihuahuas are known and treasured for their small size.

Teacup Chihuahua is the nickname given to the tiniest version of this already miniature breed of dog; the "teacup" is not a separate breed or type of Chihuahua. Teacups typically weigh less than 3 pounds. Often the hardest part of adopting these little guys is finding one -- but if you’re patient, it will happen.

Locate a local Chihuahua rescue group or an animal shelter. Chihuahuas that have lost their homes often end up in such places, where they await someone to come and adopt them. It’s not unusual for rescue groups to place such dogs in foster care while they wait, so it may be hard to see available dogs at just any time. Shelters, on the other hand, typically keep their charges in kennels on hand, where you can view those that are available or will be available for adoption.

Complete any necessary paperwork before you adopt your teacup Chihuahua. A rescue group usually wants to know a lot about you before they will let you take one of their dogs. The group will want to ensure that you can care for the dog and that you understand how to care for a teacup dog. Some rescue groups may not place these tiny canines in homes with children, and they may also screen for safe environments and homes in which the dog won’t be on his own too much. Expect to have to pass a screening before being considered for an available rescue dog. Animal shelters typically have different standards for adoption, and the process is generally much simpler. In both cases you may need to go on a waiting list until a teacup Chihuahua becomes available.

Pay all required fees. Rescue groups use fees to pay for the care they have given your new pet and also to help take care of other needy dogs. Shelters also use fees to support operation of the shelter, though they are also often subsidized by tax money, grants or other funds. Fees can run into the hundreds of dollars, depending on the group, the dog and the situation; usually the fees cover shots, spaying or neutering costs, and any other expenses the dog may have had. Once the fees are paid, you are likely free to take your newly adopted teacup Chihuahua home.

Tip

  • Animal shelters often have lists of rescue groups, so check with your local shelter to see if there’s a Chihuahua rescue in your area.

Warning

  • Try to adopt a teacup Chihuahua locally, if you can. Many rescue groups only place dogs in their immediate areas so they can continue to keep an eye on your dog's welfare. If you find a rescue group online, don’t be surprised if they turn you down for an adoption if you live too far away.
 

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