How to Adopt Retired Bloodhounds From the Department of Corrections

The bloodhound's abundant wrinkles on the face and neck set it apart from other breeds.

The bloodhound's abundant wrinkles on the face and neck set it apart from other breeds.

Bloodhounds are uniquely beautiful and excellent companions. They are commonly used in law enforcement, but their affectionate nature and outgoing personality have attracted a growing group of fans. Bloodhounds may be a challenging to find, but it can be done. A great place start is your state department of corrections.

Visit the website of your State Department of Corrections. When you reach the website, in most cases, you will click the department's K-9 unit to find information about its adoption program. Most unit pages will have pictures and detailed information about dogs up for adoption. If you do not see a tab for the K-9 unit, use the site's search function to locate the department’s adoption programs.

Review pictures and descriptions of the dogs up for adoption and you will likely come across a number of bloodhounds, Labradors and German shepherds. If you do not find what you are looking for, contact the department and ask if it has recently released any bloodhounds to the local shelter. It will be happy to provide any information you need.

Select the bloodhounds that you may be interested in and jot down their names or print the descriptions.

Review adoption requirements, information about adoption fees and any other pertinent information about the department’s adoption program. This information may be included within the text on the adoption page, or you may have to download an information packet.

Follow the instructions to begin the application process. Department of corrections application procedures vary greatly, so you may be required to apply online, you may have to print the application and apply by mail (or drop it off at the department), or you may have to visit the department in person to begin the process. An in-person interview following application submission and verification may also be required.

Tip

  • Although retired, your adopted bloodhound will still desire activity. Exercise is important to these high-energy hounds, so continue to walk your bloodhound, take him to the park to play, and allow him to run around in the backyard and play with toys around the home. The best bloodhound owner is an active, patient person in a rural or suburban home.
 

About the Author

Michelle Burton is a writer, city editor and the author of several books. She holds an M.F.A. in creative writing.

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